Disappointment with the Ontario Autism Program

Disappointment with the Ontario Autism Program

On December 7th, the Ontario Government announced an update to the Ontario Autism Program stating that parents now have more choice: ABA or ABA. Autistics for Autistics (A4A) responded with a Position Statement. Now, Ontario Parents of Autistics (OPA) have also responded with a Position Statement as well.

On Thursday’s Tele Town Hall meeting, it was disappointing to hear Minister Couteau emphatically state that he has been clear from the beginning that the Ontario Autism Program will only cover Applied Behavioural Analysis (ABA) services, and that the program is only for young children.
What was promising was that after many callers inquired about the restriction of choice to behavioural services, the lack of consultation with autistics themselves, and the age of those served, the Minister said that he is open to another round of talks with the public about other services that would be helpful.
This is a step forward and a CALL TO ACTION for parents, autistics, and service providers to voice your concerns and suggestions for autism supports, services, and interventions in Ontario. Please REGISTER when registration is posted for next Wednesday’s (January 17th) virtual Tele Town Hall conference call HERE and tell the Minister that the program should cover a range of well-researched and cited services and supports shown to be effective–NOT just ABA. Ontarians want real CHOICE!
Fall 2017 Bulletin now available

Fall 2017 Bulletin now available

The Fall edition of the Autism D.A.T.A. bulletin is available! This issue features four North American schools that use the Developmental, Individual differences, Relationship-based (DIR) Model and a piece about Foundation Academics. CLICK HERE to view the Fall 2017 bulletin. You can also SIGN UP to receive an email when the next Bulletin is published.

Spring 2017 Bulletin now available

Spring 2017 Bulletin now available

The Spring edition of the Autism D.A.T.A. bulletin is available! This issue features the Infant and Early Childhood Development graduate program at Fielding University and the research of its students. CLICK HERE to view the Spring 2017 bulletin. You can also SIGN UP to receive an email when the next Bulletin is published.

Why Do We Advocate for Parent Choice in Funding for Autism Therapies?

Why Do We Advocate for Parent Choice in Funding for Autism Therapies?

When parents get a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), a panic ensues and the scrambling begins. In Ontario, Canada, we are told to get on the wait list for ABA or IBI therapy (Applied Behavioural Analysis or Intense Behavioural Intervention). Most parents don’t even stop to consider alternatives, because none are offered.

Here at Autism D.A.T.A., we advocate for a developmental approach to autism intervention and so does the Association for Developmental Autism Programs and Therapies (ADAPT), our “sister site” in Manitoba. This week, its parent advocate published a nice piece outlining some differences between behavioural and developmental therapies, drawing from her experience with both.

Please click on the title in the blue button below to read the blog post:

I hope that you found ADAPT’s blog informative and helpful. You can learn more about the Developmental Approach to autism intervention at Affect Autism by clicking HERE and THERE.

Stay tuned for the Winter 2017 Bulletin coming this month at Autism D.A.T.A….

Canadians: Have Your Say in Canada’s Future Accessibility Legislation

Canadians: Have Your Say in Canada’s Future Accessibility Legislation

Autism DATA is borrowing from the Association for Developmental Autism Programs and Therapies, ADAPT Manitoba to bring you this important news about voicing your thoughts for the future of Canada’s Accessibility legislation. Thank you to ADAPT for this important blog post:

Our Federal government is planning on creating legislation to protect the rights of people with disabilities.

Citizens are invited to give input as to what this legislation should look like.

From the government website:

Many Canadians continue to face barriers that affect their ability to participate in daily activities that most people take for granted. These could include:

  • physical and architectural barriers that impede the ability to move freely in the built environment, use public transportation, access information or use technology;
  • attitudes, beliefs and misconceptions that some people may have about people with disabilities and what they can and cannot do; and
  • outdated policies and practices that do not take into account the varying abilities and disabilities that people may have.

ADAPT would suggest that there are some significant gaps for children:  restrictions on the accessibility of therapy for children with autism, and barriers within the school system created by funding and lack of understanding among some professionals…

The opportunity to comment is open until February 2017.  You can fill out an online survey here, or join ASAN Winnipeg on January 19 as they work through responses together.  Check their Facebook page for details.

Please take the time to share your thoughts.  This legislation will lay important groundwork for the future.

Thank you to ADAPT Manitoba for the reminder about this important and timely opportunity.